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Welsh Slate wins Westminster’s vote

Welsh Slate wins Westminster’s vote

Welsh Slate

Two types of Welsh Slate feature on the new roof of London’s Irish Embassy. The £2.5 million re-roof of the Grade II listed Irish Embassy in London, with more than 10,000 Penrhyn Heather Blue slates from Welsh Slate, has required its own exceptional levels of diplomacy. DarntonB3 Architecture had multiple challenges to factor in when it came to specifying the replacement slates, including the City of Westminster’s planning department, which was keen to see as many of the existing slates re-used as possible and required convincing to embrace the “new” metric sizes. Then there were landlords Grosvenor Estates, leaseholders the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and Historic England, not to mention the site being opposite Buckingham Palace, on a “Red route” with diplomatic bays nearby, and between two of the most important Conservation Areas of Belgravia. Work began on the landlocked Grosvenor Place site in March 2018, a year after DarntonB3, who are specialist conservation architects, were appointed to oversee the project, and has just completed (January 2019). Two types of Welsh slates have been used on the former terraced town mansion with decorative metal roof crest that was designed by architect Thomas Cundy, who was surveyor to the Grosvenor Estate at the time, and built in 1868 in a French Renaissance style. Roofing contractor Mundy Roofing was involved at an early stage in the project and were ultimately appointed as principal contractor. Specialising in leadwork and natural slate roofing, they were pivotal to the project’s success. A total of 600m2 of County-grade 500mm x 300mm slates have been used on the numerous standard 30° to 35° pitched roofs while Capital-grade bespoke arrow-head slates of the same colour but sized at 400mm x 250mm were used around dormer windows on the 80° mansard roof elements that are reminiscent of Paris and feature lead secret gutter detailing around the perimeter. There is also some vertical slating to the rear elevation.  The old 5mm to 7mm thick slates had been on the roof since it was first built 150 years ago. The rectangular ones had been slightly longer and narrower, at 510mm x 255mm, while the arrow-head slates had been smaller all round, at 350mm x 200mm.  But a roof survey showed they were not laid to the correct bond or headlaps and fixing points were far from ideal and non-existent in places (the headlaps between 0 and 50mm), leading to the hardened sarking underneath becoming sodden in places. In fact, most of the roof had been repaired over the years with different types of slates using temporary lead tags or painted with a bitumen solution in an attempt to prolong its life. DarntonB3 argued that if the roof was re-installed as existing, its appearance would alter as they would have no option but to lay the slates at the correct headlap which would create additional courses. In addition, using the slightly larger arrow-head slates for the mansard roof would enable them to form a more robust detail at the abutments to the dormers and party wall.  Home to the Irish Embassy for the past 70 years, the building comprises office and entertainment space. The traditional timber truss roof featured timber sarking boards with penny gaps, a form of construction usually found in Scotland. The slates were then fixed with copper nails directly to the boarding without any timber battens. Once city planners had agreed to 100% replacement of the Welsh slates, at the new metric sizes (a process that took a year), the addition of timber counter battens, to improve ventilation of the roof and prolong the life of the new slates, was also proposed by the Architects. Mundy Roofing produced sample comparison mock-ups to demonstrate to the conservation officer this change would not be detrimental to the building’s character. As it is, the interface details where slates have been lifted has not altered the character of the building and the introduction of battens would not be known by the general observer.  DarntonB3 senior associate Matthew Jones, who was project manager and lead architect throughout, said: “Westminster City Council are regarded as one of the leading conservation-led councils in the UK, with some of the highest standards and criteria to meet, and dialogue with the conservation officer was detailed and robust. The need for wholesale replacement of the existing slate due to them being at the end of their life was a delicate decision and sufficient evidence of this necessity was proven. The replacement of the slates with metric sizes was also an extensively discussed item but the principal contractor and Welsh Slate worked with us to develop the narrative.” Keith Hamilton, an architect accredited in building conservation, acting for DarntonB3 alongside Matthew was reasonably sure Welsh slates had been used previously but was keen to ensure the correct thickness and grading were eventually used throughout the renewal process.  He said “We have specified Welsh Slate on numerous other projects and their reputation for the highest quality precedes them. We were able to argue the merits of increased ventilation behind the slates using cross battening in lieu of direct nailing to the existing sarking board, which in the majority of areas had survived over 150 years’ performance. “The risk of lack of ventilation on the lower roof pitches behind the slates was particularly relevant at the eaves and head. We had previously considered introducing slate vents and felt underlay to augment any need for ventilation but the existence of the ‘penny gaps’ in the sarking boards encouraged us, to believe that this was not required.  “This was another point of continued discussion with the conservation officer who was against an underlay in this instance. The timber sarking was found to be in remarkable condition considering the lack of existing underlay and the direct fix of the slates, highlighting the quality of the original slates. Hence, there is no secondary layer apart from the slating itself and we trust the quality of the new Welsh slate will replicate the existing quality and last another 100 years.” Due to tight access on the roof, they were also able to widen the lead gutters and set back the lower courses of slates to avoid getting them broken. All the new Penrhyn slates were holed and traditionally fixed with 38mm copper nails as opposed to clipped or other methods. The standard-size slates were able to cope with the wide variation of roof pitches and new rooflights encountered by varying the lap and gauge slightly. In virtually every case, the slate junctions are with lead or copper flashings and as it was appreciated there is some risk of staining, all lead was treated with patination oil. Using new treated timber battens for fixing the new slates proved a great success as direct fixing into the old hardened sarking boarding would have been a major problem and time consuming.  Matthew said the support they had received from Welsh Slate had been “fantastic” and included a site visit to match the type of slate, a letter explaining the need to change from imperial to metric sizing, technical drawings of the arrow-head slates, technical information on the end life of slates and their unsuitability for re-use, on-time deliveries with little if no wastage, and recommending experienced slating contractors. Mundy Roofing were on site for a total of 10 months. Work included the rebuilding of three chimney stacks, involving 30 tonnes of stone and brickwork, and restoration of traditionally-forged wrought ironwork to the pavilion roof crest, all underneath a temporary roof. Russell Mundy said: “This project was extremely challenging due to it being a working embassy but Welsh Slate were excellent with their support in achieving planning consent and the product has received widespread praise from the client.” Matthew said: “Due to the extremely difficult access to this roof, we were conscious to use a slate that will require little maintenance (if any) and satisfy appearance for an extended period of time. Welsh Slate were able to provide technical studies comparing different types of slate and their longevity. This enabled the landlord, Grosvenor Estates, that the new roof should outlast the previous roof and match it entirely with other buildings nearby. Welsh Slate’s evidence on the existing slates being at the end of their useful life, and the lifecycle information of the new slates, helped give the conservation officer comfort that the right approach was being taken for the building.” Keith added: “Essentially, Welsh Slate ensured we got the right slate, quality, consistency and sizes for the varying roof pitches and conditions. There have been no problems with mixing batches or colour variations which can occur. They also met the stringent programme requirements, reducing risks of delay from the main contractor. To our knowledge, there have been no rejects on quality of slates. “The final result is the new slating looks exactly like it was envisaged in 1868, except with the knowledge it is better-fixed and easier to reach for maintenance, with a discreet fall arrest system fitted. The client is extremely happy with the quality of the final works.” Andrea Fox, senior architect with the property management unit of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, said: “The team have provided us with an exceptional and beautiful project that we know will stand the test of time and one we are extremely proud to have commissioned.” “I want to thank the Welsh Slate team for the support they provided during our project and especially in relation to protracted issues relating to the listed building consent approval.” 
Welsh Slate tops a sustainability exemplar

Welsh Slate tops a sustainability exemplar

Welsh Slate

Roofing slates from Welsh Slate feature on the Duchy of Cornwall’s Nansledan development. As work continues at Nansledan - the Duchy of Cornwall’s award-winning 218-hectare mixed-use urban extension to Newquay – Welsh slates are continuing to make their mark. Hundreds of Welsh Slate’s Penrhyn Heather Blues in two sizes – 500mm x 300mm and 400mm x 250mm - are being installed on the roofs, and as vertical slating on window bays and under-window panels, by a pair of specialist contractors for two of the scheme’s three housebuilder developers. Horizon Roofing, based in Redruth, has been installing the Welsh slates for housebuilder CG Fry and Son, while Wessex Slate and Tile Roofing Services, based in Indian Queens, has been doing the same for Wain Homes. The Welsh slates were one of the material options specified by the scheme’s master planners, ADAM Architecture, in order to meet the Duchy’s requirements to use local materials wherever possible and particularly those which are compatible with the local Cornish vernacular. Although they have been used on a mixture of houses and apartments at Nansledan, the roof pitches have been designed in a traditional way and to accommodate materials such as slate. As most Cornish vernacular buildings are simple volumes with simple roofs, the Pattern Book for Nansledan reinforces an approach which minimises the need for special connections, although they do occasionally happen. The vision for Nansledan evolved through extensive public consultation, culminating in an Enquiry by Design exercise hosted by The Prince’s Foundation in 2004. Detailed planning permission for the first phase was granted in 2012, and construction started in early 2014. Over time, Nansledan will evolve into a community of up to 3,700 homes, with its own high street, primary school, social and public spaces, green infrastructure and other facilities. Nansledan is already home to some 30 local businesses and has quickly become a sought-after commercial location. Architecturally, the development draws upon local vernacular styles, capturing the spirit of Newquay’s urban fabric while remaining unafraid to reinterpret, and supported by the Newquay Pattern Book and a Building Code. The masterplan at Nansledan was developed by ADAM Architecture using a wide range of well-tested, sustainable traditional urban design principles overlaid with a contemporary view to how things will develop in terms of climate and energy use. Traditionally designed and constructed houses have been proved to stand the test of time for hundreds of years and the traditional materials used at Nansledan have tended to age well, often looking better as they age. ADAM Architecture director Hugh Petter, who is Nansledan’s masterplanner and coordinating architect, said: “Using Welsh Slate aides the sustainability objective, as a reasonably local, long-lasting material. The slate is also characteristic of Newquay and Cornwall, as such it reflects local identity, and adds to the cohesion with Newquay.”  Hugh added: “The Duchy and its developers remain happy with the quality of the product. Wherever possible, the Duchy sources its slate from the UK for sustainability reasons and Welsh Slate has provided a good solution for this. “Their finished appearance was compatible with the character of Cornish vernacular architecture, and the other local materials that have been specified across the site. The Welsh Slate has been found to be best-suited for larger houses with relatively uncomplex roof shapes.” Wessex Slate and Tile Roofing Services are two years into the current project phase, fixing the Welsh Slate with two copper clout nails to small roof areas of approximately 80m2, working with around 30 properties in a block. The specification for them is mainly cold roof space, with rafters under felt, batten and slates fixed in random width and diminishing courses. Sized slates are also used depending on availability. Their estimator and materials co-ordinator Treve Kitchen said: “Welsh Slate is detailed on the build plans for the roofs because of its quality, performance, looks and sustainability credentials. It’s a high-quality product and very good to work with.  “Our clients, the Duchy of Cornwall, work to very clear principals and place a priority on natural, sustainable, local materials and labour, skills and craftsmanship.       “The project has been logistically challenging due to material shortages and constrictions. Maintaining the resources required on a long-term basis whilst also servicing our other clients has also been a challenge but one we have certainly been very happy to have!” Spencer Osborn, managing director of Horizon Roofing who have completed seven phases, said the roofs were standard in the main but solar tiles had now been introduced to some plots. “Overall, the project is a challenge due to the intense labour requirement, but the Welsh Slate has performed perfectly well,” she added. Nansledan won a RIBA South West Award 2021 when the judges said: “At a detailed level, painted timber boarding, render – rough and smooth, granite, hanging slate, brickwork and art-deco embellishments all combine to bring architectural variety, but the real achievement here is at the masterplan level, with a new urban settlement that shows great townscape and landscape led placemaking potential.” It also won the category ‘Framework + Masterplan Large’ in the National Urban Design Awards 2021 and was shortlisted for the Planning Awards 2021 in two categories - Plan Making and Housing Development over 500 homes. 
Welsh Slate tops the menu at Clifton College

Welsh Slate tops the menu at Clifton College

Welsh Slate

Two types of Welsh Slate roofing slates have helped breathe new life into the stunning Grade II listed dining hall of a top independent school. A total of 15,000 of Welsh Slate’s rectangular Cwt y Bugail and arrow-head Penrhyn Heather Blue slates now feature on the duo-pitch roof at Clifton College in Bristol. The three-storey dining hall/kitchen, which is one of, if not the biggest building in a cluster of stunning Victorian constructions, had not been re-roofed since it was built 156 years ago to a design by architect Charles Hansom.
Welsh Slate tops a honourable restoration at Lincoln’s Inn

Welsh Slate tops a honourable restoration at Lincoln’s Inn

Welsh Slate

Penrhyn Heather Blue slates from Welsh Slate feature on Lincoln’s Inn’s Great Hall. One of London’s most unique buildings is enjoying a new lease of life, thanks to Welsh Slate. The Great Hall and Library Buildings of The Honourable Society of Lincoln’s Inn, an association of students, barristers and judges and one of the four Inns of Court, have over the past two years undergone an extensive programme of external conservation carried out by expert stone masons Capital Stone.  The programme of work includes replacement of the Great Hall’s slate roof covering. Work is still ongoing, with anticipated overall completion in April/May this year, but the work to the Great Hall roof is complete, as is the striking of the temporary roof covering which brings the new roof into view.  The Great Hall and Library Buildings were constructed from 1843 to 1845. The Great Hall roof was originally covered with lead but was recovered in 1868 with slate. From 1871 to 1873 the Library was extended eastwards by three bays. The building is an important example of 19th Century Gothic Revival architecture and has been listed Grade II* since 1951.  After 154 years, the slates on the roof of the Great Hall required replacing to protect the interior, including a striking fresco and beautifully worked oak. The slates were suffering from surface delamination and a large proportion had slipped due to nail rot, requiring tingles to hold them in place. The existing slates were found to originate from both the Ordovician and Cambrian deposits of North Wales – the former predominately on the eastern elevation and the latter on the western. The large Ordovician slates, typically 850mm long and between 350mm and 500mm wide (and laid to a fixed gauge of approximately 350mm which equates to a head lap of approximately 100mm), originated from what is now Welsh Slate’s Ffestiniog quarry, which is currently mothballed, while the other quarries producing these no longer operate. The Cambrian slates from the Llanberis region, as well as Bethesda where Welsh Slate’s main quarry is based, were even larger, at 850mm long and wider than 450mm, laid to the same gauge. Both slate types were fixed to timber battens on open timber rafters, with the underside torched with horsehair and lime plaster. These were replaced for the closest Welsh slate match – Welsh Slate’s County-grade Penrhyn Heather Blues, at 800mm long, widths of between 400mm and 550mm, and a 350mm gauge and 100mm head lap. These are guaranteed for 100 years, with a useful life of 150 years. While the roof is generally simple in form, with two large slopes, its substantial size at circa 800m2 meant the work took considerable time to complete. To allow for more than a dozen dormers the Welsh Slate had to be cut and fitted to size with double copper clout nails. The thickest slates were used on the eaves, diminishing towards the ridge to maintain the original visual finish. They were also holed from the rear to provide a slight countersink to the face. The Great Hall operates by day as a dining hall for members of the Inn, and by night, as a venue for dinners, receptions and weddings for up to 400 people. Set in 11 acres of beautiful grounds in Holborn, Central London, it is the closest Inn to the Royal Courts of Justice. Henry Skinner, Head of Projects and Facilities Management at The Honourable Society of Lincoln’s Inn, said: “The replacement of the roof covering was far from straightforward, despite its externally simplistic construction. During stripping of the existing roof covering, we had to deal with atmospheric lead contamination of a horsehair felt that sat between the original slates and close boarding, requiring controlled measures of removal and disposal.  “Furthermore, the close boarding had warped over time, causing an undulation between roof trusses that needed to be spaced out. This was achieved through the introduction of additional battens and packing timbers to create a level surface onto which the new slate could be laid.” Casey Wickers, trainee quantity surveyor with Capital Stone Renovation, said: “The main work of stripping the existing roof was extremely challenging and labour intensive, to not only remove, wash and handle each slate manually through a tight scaffolding design, but also doing so whilst wearing full RPE due to the lead contamination. “With the two stunning roof facades in full view, the quality of the Welsh slates can be seen by all.
Welsh Slate helps bring integrity to a British Museum development

Welsh Slate helps bring integrity to a British Museum development

Welsh Slate

Flooring by Welsh Slate features in a new gallery at the British Museum. Natural slate flooring by Welsh Slate was specified for the refurbishment of a gallery at the British Museum for a multitude of reasons. Some 172m2 of various sizes of Cwt-y- Bugail dark blue grey floor slates from Welsh Slate Ltd were used on the redevelopment of the museum’s “Middle Room”, one of the oldest rooms in Sir Robert Smirke’s Georgian museum. They were specified by Purcell architects, the museum’s conservation architects and lead consultants, based on their working knowledge of the product.
Welsh Slate heads up Sarah Beeny’s new home

Welsh Slate heads up Sarah Beeny’s new home

Welsh Slate

Roofing slates by Welsh Slate star in presenter’s new TV programme.Roofing slates by Welsh Slate were the material of choice for TV property expert Sarah Beeny’s own home-in-the-making which is the star of the Channel 4 series “Sarah Beeny’s new life in the country”.The “Homes on 4” series follows Sarah and her family (husband and four sons aged 11 to 17 years) as they swap London life for a new start on a 220-acre, semi-derelict former dairy farm in Somerset, where they are building a modern and sustainable stately home of their dreams.
Welsh Slate proves just the topping for Queen's Lace

Welsh Slate proves just the topping for Queen's Lace

Welsh Slate

Cwt-y-Bugail roof slates feature on a £5 million new-build private house. Professional landscaper Claire Merriman commissioned an architect to design the latest project in her burgeoning property development portfolio. When they proposed Welsh Slate for the roof of the new five-bedroom, five-bathroom private house in five acres of stunning countryside in Surrey, she was happy to acquiesce but wanted to compare the British product with its Chinese and Spanish equivalents.
Welsh Slate helps give a London landmark a new lease of life

Welsh Slate helps give a London landmark a new lease of life

Welsh Slate

Roofing slates from Welsh Slate's Cwt-y-Bugail quarry were specified for the new-look Royal Pagoda. Welsh Slate roofing slates have played a “critical” role in the award-winning renovation of one of London’s most unusual buildings. A two-year conservation project to restore the roofs, and 80 decorative dragons, on the 18th Century Great Pagoda in the World Heritage Site of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew will give the public access to the upper floors for the first time in decades.
Welsh Slate walling helps new hotel win an international award

Welsh Slate walling helps new hotel win an international award

Welsh Slate

The Pig Hotel in Cornwall features rustic walling from Welsh Slate. A £13 million conversion of a listed country house into a boutique restaurant with rooms during the Covid pandemic has been rewarded with a Top 100 hotels award, thanks in part to Welsh Slate rustic walling. The manufacturer’s Cwt Y Bugail rustic walling features as the external masonry skin over 1,000m2 of a new luxury bedrooms extension to The Pig Hotel, formerly the Grade II listed Harlyn House, overlooking Harlyn Bay near Padstow in Cornwall. The hotel opened in July after a three-year refurbishment project and has now won a place as “Best hotel with heart” in Tatler’s annual Travel Awards which celebrate the creme de la creme of hotels from all over the globe. Welsh Slate’s rustic walling took multiple teams of stonemasons nine months to clad the Stonehouse - a stone courtyard building built from new but in a traditional style, with rooms whose views overlook the courtyard and the gardens. Supplied by Cornwall-based distributor Contec SW, it was specified to match the original stone of the main 15th Century house, to provide a quality boutique to match The Pig brand image. Contec’s managing director Rob Furse said: “We specified the Welsh Slate rustic walling for its strength and availability as the brief required traditional stone materials. We prefer to use British wherever possible and find that most of our clients do too. Intense discussions in relation to choice of colour, durability and finishes involved 100% input from this client. “Slate’s sustainability was also a major selling point to the client who is so satisfied with it they are using it on another upcoming project.” He added: “We regularly use the Welsh Slate rustic walling as part of our walling range, with deliveries nearly every day. It is our No 2 best-selling product for 2020. Welsh Slate has come to be an indispensable supplier to our range of natural stone products.” John Steadman, Welsh Slate’s specification sales manager for the south west and Wales, said: “This project shows off our rustic walling extremely well. This material is becoming more frequently used in Cornwall where there is a lot of high-end building going on, in places like Rock.”
Welsh Slate helps save Dover mansion block from its Waterloo

Welsh Slate helps save Dover mansion block from its Waterloo

Welsh Slate

Dover’s Waterloo Mansions are treated to a Welsh Slate reroof. An unusual double-mansard roof on a Grade II listed seafront mansion block is enjoying a new lease of life, thanks to Welsh Slate. Some 11,000 Penrhyn Heather Blue Capital-grade slates from Welsh Slate now adorn the roof and elevations of Waterloo Mansions, part of a Georgian terrace which overlooks Dover harbour, designed in the 1830s by Philip Hardwick, architect of the Euston Arch. The multi-million pound project to refurbish the six-storey building envelope for client Dover Harbour Board was completed this summer by main contractor Walker Construction after several years, and several Covid lockdowns. Architects Hazle McCormack Young LLP were commissioned to carry out a series of specific refurbishments/repairs to areas of the building. But the project eventually grew to encompass a full exterior envelope refurbishment to address the poor condition of the fabric and rectify some of the original design defects and subsequent poorly executed repairs/alterations that were contributing to the deterioration of the building. Challenges included its Grade II listing which required extensive discussions and close collaboration with Dover District Council’s heritage team, its highly exposed location on the historic seafront, and resolving issues with the original design without impacting the character of the building in a Conservation Area. Original slates taken from the roof and elevations of the fifth and sixth storeys of the older parts of the building were identified as Welsh and the specified 500mm x 300mm products from Welsh Slate were the closest match. Project architect Nathaniel Seall said: “Some areas had been previously replaced with slates we believe were Spanish and the appearance did not match. The use of traditional materials and techniques as close as reasonably possible to the original was a key part of the project philosophy and approach taken by the client and design team.” The upper and lower mansards are steep (up to around 72º), which affected the overlaps and some of the leadwork detailing, but the specification was otherwise mainly determined by the size and format of the original slates to maintain the appearance, as well as the exposed location, to ensure the roofing and cladding covering would be robust enough to withstand the coastal conditions. The roof presented a wide range of features – hipped ends, several changes of pitch, parapet gutters and dormer windows. It also had to be vented below the coverings, as a layer of insulation was introduced between the timbers to improve its thermal performance. This meant careful detailing at all the direction changes – eaves and ridges, for example - to ensure the ventilated cavity was maintained but still achieving the weathering. The slate’s main interface is with traditionally executed leadwork to abutments, parapet gutters and the roof crowns, which required careful detailing and close collaboration with the specialist roofing contractor, Butler Brothers Roofing, to maintain the ventilated cavity below the coverings. Here, the architects made extensive use of stainless steel formers to the leadwork in place of timber grounds, as this keeps these details very slim and discreet, allowing them to be incorporated without impacting the balance of lead to slate and affecting the overall appearance. Nathaniel said: “The Welsh Slate plays a significant part in the project as the roof covering was the only element of the fabric to be fully replaced. Everything else has been refurbished or repaired in situ. It is also an important part of the overall appearance and character of the building, particularly with the slightly unusual double-storey mansard.” He added that buying British had a role to play too. “While the heritage connection and desire to match the original covering from a conservation point of view was the principal driver behind selecting Welsh Slate, we were also conscious of the general consensus that the longevity and robustness of a Welsh slate is superior to other options, and given the condition and scale of the project felt that this made it more appropriate,” he said. So too did slate’s sustainability. Nathaniel said: “As a conservation project where the material choice is somewhat pre-determined, this was not initially as much of a consideration as it would be on other projects, but we do take the overall environmental impact and carbon cost of the materials we specify very seriously, and in this respect a natural, more locally-sourced, durable, and in principle re-usable material like slate has many plus-points. “Part of the interest in this project, and in conservation work generally, is understanding how some of the materials and techniques used in the past can be adapted to modern construction, and actually have better environmental credentials than many of the more modern, commonly-used materials we are familiar with. “As a practice we have specified Welsh Slate in the past, principally on other projects with a conservation aspect. Often this ends up being changed as part of value engineering, unfortunately.” Butler Brothers Roofing were 18 months on site fixing the Welsh slates on 633m2 of roof with two stainless steel nails each, to minimum headlaps of 76mm (on the vertical faces of mansard) and 98mm (to roof pitches over 30°) over counter-battened sarking boards. Director Gary Butler said: “This project was very challenging if you take into consideration the problems with updating the insulation and ventilation whilst trying to adhere to conservation rules. The specification shows the complexity of the project. But the Welsh slates performed brilliantly, as they do every time.”
Del Carmen Ultra: A New Angle On Slate In Australia

Del Carmen Ultra: A New Angle On Slate In Australia

Spanish Slate Quarries UK Ltd

Our projects in Australia have quickly become some of our best work. SSQ boasts one of the strongest brands in Australia with the Del Carmen, Ultra grade slate. Working alongside Melbourne’s very own Roof Services for the last 20 years, we have supplied some interesting projects that demonstrate the qualities of the Del Carmen Ultra slate. SSQ’s Del Carmen Ultra is sourced from an exclusive slate quarry in the Cabrera Mountains of North-West Spain. It is consistently chosen by architects around the world for its unrivalled beauty and exceptional high quality.
Del Carmen Takes Home Roof Slating Award

Del Carmen Takes Home Roof Slating Award

Spanish Slate Quarries UK Ltd

A project utilising our Del Carmen Spanish Slate took home the award for Roof Slating at this year’s UK Roofing Awards, hosted by the National Federation of Roofing Contractors (NFRC). The NFRC is the largest and most influential roofing trade association in the UK, promoting both quality products and contractors, while ensuring that its members are at the forefront of all roofing developments. Contour Roofing (Essex) was given the task of providing the roof coverings to St Joseph’s College, a Grade II listed building (1866) on the fringes of Mill Hill Village.
Welsh Slate helps Attleys catch a curve ball at Coal Drops Yard

Welsh Slate helps Attleys catch a curve ball at Coal Drops Yard

Welsh Slate

Some 92,000 Cwt Y Bugail slates feature on a ground-breaking new/old roof. Formerly a seedy area worth avoiding, London’s Kings Cross has now been transformed into a go-to destination for office workers, students and tourists. Developer Argent’s regeneration of the area has sensitively re-purposed the early Victorian railway buildings into variously, a college campus, supermarket and offices, in which the interior changes are radical but the exteriors have been left largely unaltered. Not so for Coal Drops Yard, a pair of elongated Victorian coal warehouses originally built to distribute coal from the North of England across London. Here, the pitched roofs of two almost-parallel buildings, 150m and 100m in length and 39m apart, have been reconfigured to curve up at their northern ends and gently kiss each other. Designed by Heatherwick Studio, the roofs peel upwards and extend into the middle of the space between the two buildings. A new floorplate sits below the roof structure, with glazing filling the gap between the two, creating a third level of retail. The new roofs of the ornate cast-iron and brick structures have been slated with 92,000 new versions of the original Welsh Slates – 500mm x 250mm Cwt Y Bugails from the manufacturer’s Llan Ffestiniog quarry in North Wales – by Banbury-based specialist sub-contractor Attleys Roofing. Attleys already had some Kings Cross experience, using 6,400 500mm x 300mm Heather Blues from Welsh Slate’s main Penrhyn quarry for the re-roof of the nearby German Gymnasium - the first purpose-built gym in England - which is now enjoying a new lease of life as a designer restaurant. Coal Drops Yard was a whole new ball game, testing Attleys to the limit, but the result is an extraordinary reinterpretation of the canal-side site. Main contractor BAM Construction was responsible for the structure of the new roofline. More than 50 new steel columns were carefully threaded through the existing structure to support the roof independently of the building, a point cloud survey being carried out to help calculate where to put the columns without clashing with the existing building fabric. Primary support is provided by a set of large cranked beams supported on cores in each building which join in the middle over the yard. There are four primary beams, two on each building. These dip down towards the centre to create the valley between the two roof structures and have been nicknamed “giraffe beams” in reference to their angled neck and head - the structure looks like two giraffes rubbing noses together. Tie beams at floor level take the tensile loads generated by the weight of the roof. The giraffe beams support two ribbon trusses that define the upper and lower edge of each roof structure and connect in the middle over the yard at the lower edge. These are 7m deep in the middle and taper to 5m at the ends where these join the existing roof. Tubular steel sections were used to create the trusses because of the complex geometry. The new floorplate below the roof is suspended from above using macalloy bars and is tapered towards the perimeter to minimise the impact on the view. More than 60 panels of full-height structural glazing between the floor and new roof are stepped rather than curved or faceted for aesthetic reasons and has the added benefit of hiding the macalloy bars. Temporary trusses were erected to support the giraffe beam assembly and ribbon trusses during construction. The giraffe beam assembly was erected first. The ribbon trusses were brought to site as components, bolted together on the ground into fully-assembled sections complete with rafters, craned into position and bolted together where they meet in the middle. The whole roof structure was then de-propped. Visually, it was important to maintain a seamless transition from the existing roof to the new section so the original timber roof trusses were retained where possible, with some localised strengthening required where the timber had been damaged. The gap between the existing and new roof structure was then boarded over ready for the new Welsh slates.The two roofs are bolted together where they meet in the middle. Heatherwick Studio chose to position the new roof element at the northern ends of the two buildings as the eastern building had been devastated by a fire in 1985. Used more recently for warehousing and nightclubs, they were largely abandoned in the 1990s. Group leader Lisa Finlay said: “Our challenge was to radically remodel this Victorian infrastructure to meet the needs of a modern urban development without losing what made them special. To do this, we focused on understanding their original function and how they were adapted over time so we could appreciate how best to preserve and reuse the existing fabric, whilst also introducing new elements. One of which is an entirely free-standing new structure threaded through the historic buildings, from which a spectacular new third level is suspended.”  Attleys were on site for a total of almost 18 months. The roof pitch of the original sections of roof was 28° but as the curves swept around and met in the middle this changed to 47°. Thereafter the length also decreased from 8.4m to 6.9m at the kissing point where the two curved roofs met but the same number of courses of slates (44) had to be maintained. This meant Attleys had to decrease the gauges and not only cut the sides of the slates to take them around the curve but also the tops of the slates to maintain the same number of courses. No clever nailing or hidden bibbing was required to stop rainwater flowing diagonally at this point as the pitch was so steep. Attleys’ managing director Shaun Attley met with Heatherwick Studio and BAM’s design team up to two years prior to commencement on site to discuss the design issues and how to achieve the aesthetics requested while using the products selected.  Shaun advised the project team that the Cwt Y Bugail slates could not be used for their initial roof design which exceeded a 90° pitch so it was re-designed to ensure that where the eaves met it was at a pitch commensurate with Welsh Slate’s fixing recommendations and warranties. Due to space being at a premium, all the Cwt Y Bugail slates were cut off-site at Attleys’ depot in Banbury. To do this, Attleys had to calculate how much of the slates needed cutting off. This was done by taking measurements from the steel work underneath - from steel to steel at the eaves and steel to steel at the ridge which was generally over 10-15m depending where you were on the curve (on the internal curve or external curve). The kissing point determined how the slates were cut to ensure the perp lines and side laps were maintained.  And because the roof pitch was increasing while the rafter length was decreasing, Attleys also had to cut the tops of the slates down so they suited the decreasing gauges. A total of 32,000 of the 90,000 slates used on the project had to be cut with hand guillotines so the dressed edge could be maintained around the curve which comprised 1,600m2 of the total 4,600m2. Shaun Attley said: “Our timescale for the sections of roof was provided to BAM Construction and this was put into their overall programme with all other sub-contractors but unfortunately our commencement on site was delayed due to previous issues in the construction of the steel frame prior to us starting.  “This meant we were up against the clock in trying to pull back time to ensure the overall programme was still met and we were asked by BAM to find ways of doing as much as possible off-site and increasing labour and production on-site to pull back the time lost. By working together with other sub-contractors and the main contractor we managed to finish a week earlier than our anticipated 43-week overall programme.” He added: “The project was challenging at the beginning to ensure we set the roof out properly but as the contract progressed it became easier. Welsh slates are easy to work, and we work with them all the time, but in this case it was challenging getting the slates to course all the way round. Attleys’ SMSTS-trained supervisor ran the day-to-day safety, conducting Toolbox talks every morning and attending daily safety briefings by BAM Construction staff and supervisors from all trades on site to brief each other of any risks and ensure trades were not disrupting one another.  The team of 10 Attleys operatives, which included two NVQ Level 2 apprentices, carried out daily visual inspections of tools and all power tools were PAT tested every three months. Shaun Attley visited weekly to inspect the job for workmanship and production and also to gather feedback on any safety issues or to see if any safety measures could be instigated to improve the overall safety for their and other operatives on site. “We found some of these measures not only improved safety but also helped improve production,” said Shaun. Attleys also had an independent safety inspector (from The Health & Safety People) visit site monthly to see if there were any safety improvements they could recommend. Far from handling eight million tonnes of coal a year, Coal Drops Yard is now forecast to pull in 12 million visitors a year.
Cedral Slates - Knock Rushen

Cedral Slates - Knock Rushen

Cedral

The site at Knock Rushen is located by the sea in an exposed area, Rivendale fibre cement slates were selected to withstand the force of the natural elements. The slates offered Hartford Homes a cost-effective solution that seamlessly blended in with the local environment. Houses in Castletown are predominantly finished with natural slate roofs but Hartford were confident that fibre cement would enable them to create a finish that would be sympathetic to the local surroundings
elZinc Slate Advance - Coast Bournemouth

elZinc Slate Advance - Coast Bournemouth

SIG Zinc & Copper

A new development of luxury seafront apartments known as ‘Coast’ is the first in the UK to take advantage of elZinc Slate Advance. Specifically designed for use in marine environments, elZinc Slate Advance has a protective coating which provides a barrier to salt damage .
Cedral Slates - Mount Wise

Cedral Slates - Mount Wise

Cedral

Thrutone Textured fibre cement slates were specified across a new housing development in Mount Wise. Mount Wise is a historic estate about one mile west of the historic centre of the city of Plymouth in Devon.
Cedral Slates - Chipping Norton

Cedral Slates - Chipping Norton

Cedral

Showcasing the finely detailed surface and dressed edges of the Cedral Rivendale slate, Bedfordshire Pilgrims Housing Association specified Rivendale to fulfil stringent specification guidelines that included using products that would be in keeping with the aesthetic surroundings of the local area.
The Beauty of Slate With None of the Drawbacks

The Beauty of Slate With None of the Drawbacks

IKO PLC

When the garage at a house in Sheffield had to be rebuilt from scratch due to unforeseen circumstances, the homeowner was keen to make sure that re-cycled products were used for the job. He also wanted a roofing tile solution that would complement the original slate on the main roof of the house.
Christ College, Riverstone Slate

Christ College, Riverstone Slate

Spanish Slate Quarries UK Ltd

Christ College is one of Britain’s oldest schools. Originally a Dominican friary, the school was founded first by royal charter in 1541 by King Henry VIII and then, after a period of inactivity, by Act of Parliament in 1855. Today, it is seen as one of the best co-educational, independent boarding and day schools in the country and has around 300 pupils. The campus is home to a rich variety of ancient and historic buildings including a number that are Grade I listed, for example the 13th-century chapel and many that are Grade II listed including.
Cedral Slates - BBC Home of the Year

Cedral Slates - BBC Home of the Year

Cedral

Cedral Thrutone Smooth slates in colour Blue-Black, were used on this beautiful new build in Co. Armagh. This stunning project won BBC House of the Year
Cedral Slates - Bicester EcoTown

Cedral Slates - Bicester EcoTown

Cedral

Lead developer A2 Dominion is running the initial phase of the North West Bicester Eco town project, which has the long-term vision of providing up to 6,000 sustainable new homes and is the first of four planned Eco towns in the UK. Announced in the Government’s Planning Policy Statement in 2009, the Eco towns are designed to achieve zero carbon development and more sustainable living using the best new design and construction. The initial phase of the North West Bicester project is called the Exemplar and main contractor Wilmott Dixon has already started to build the first 94 of the 393 planned highly efficient true zero carbon homes which will create the UK's first zero carbon community that is using Rivendale Fibre Cement Slates for its roofing. Bicester Eco town was designed to achieve zero carbon development and more sustainable living using the best new design and construction. Rivendale fibre cement slates were specified for the roofs on the Exemplar phase by main contractor Wilmott Dixon. The homes are highly efficient true zero carbon homes which helped to create the UK's first zero carbon community.
Roofs with a view: slate used on the view development

Roofs with a view: slate used on the view development

Cupa Pizarras

CUPA 9 slates have been specified as part of a modern luxury housing development in Yorkshire. The company’s natural Spanish slates were chosen on account of their aesthetic value, long-term durability and competitive pricing.  Set amongst the foothills of the Yorkshire Wolds and with panoramic views of the Humber Estuary, ‘The View’ in Swanland is a luxury 14 house development, which has been led by main developer, Church Gate Homes. The high-end collection of properties has been delivered using premium building solutions, including CUPA PIZARRAS H9, with each property featuring around 10,000 individual slates.  Excelling in terms of aesthetics and long-lasting performance, natural roofing slates are capable of enduring extreme temperatures, are fire-resistant and unaffected by UV light. Incredibly durable, solutions manufactured from slate can offer a lifecycle of over 100 years. Additionally, the natural make up of the material ensures that it is also the most sustainable roofing option on the market.  Specifically, CUPA 9 is a grey slate with a very smooth surface and is taken from one of CUPA PIZARRAS’ own quarries in Riofrío de Aliste in Northern Spain. With its traditional beauty, the natural slate is ideal for use across heritage projects. However, the stylish aesthetic of the material also lends itself equally well to modern developments, such as ‘The View’ where it can be used to create sleek roof designs.  Speaking on the project, Calum Cowham, Marketing Manager at Burton Roofing Merchants Ltd commented: “The project team needed a roofing solution that both looked and performed perfectly. With the CUPA 9 slates that’s exactly what they got. What’s more, the company’s natural slate product range is available at a highly competitive price point, which owes a lot to CUPA PIZARRAS’ efficient and effective production methods.” Martin Sutton, Operations Manager at Church Gate Homes commented: “When working on high-value properties, it is important to offer customers products, which combine durability and aesthetic value. This is exactly what CUPA PIZARRAS slates allowed us to do at ‘The View’. The company’s natural products perfectly suited the prestigious nature of the site.” As well as offering quality slate solutions, the CUPA PIZARRAS specialists were also on hand to assist the installation team at Church Gate Homes with specific advice on how to fit the slates in line with all relevant standards and requirements. Similarly, the installation team benefitted from the onsite support of leading roofing merchant, Burton Roofing Merchants Ltd. Burton Roofing’s team helped to ensure products were safely delivered to site when required and provided further technical assistance where necessary.  “The roofing installation at ‘The View’ was very straightforward and the finished results look great,” commented Martin. “The CUPA PIZARRAS slates have provided a clean and tidy appearance, which fits well across all of the properties. What’s more, we were able to carry out the installation with very little waste, which further bolstered the product’s cost-effective and environmental credentials.” To this end, natural slate solutions also have the added benefit of requiring no chemical or heat treatments that need gas during their production. To ensure even greater environmental performance, CUPA PIZARRAS also endeavours to recycle all of its processing water via a closed circuit, and works to restore exhausted quarries by hydroseeding native plants and ensuring the natural recovery of the local flora and fauna. CUPA PIZARRAS has also been recognised and certified by the Carbon Trust as a carbon neutral company. This recognition highlights the company’s comprehensive effort in sustainability and makes it the first slate production company to achieve carbon neutrality within its operations.  All properties at ‘The View’ were sold prior to the commencement of the development. Work at the site continues to progress with the project team working to complete the bespoke designs of its individual customers.  
Heavy 3 slate used on scottish whisky distillery

Heavy 3 slate used on scottish whisky distillery

Cupa Pizarras

A number of pre-existing farm structures have been reconstructed using CUPA PIZARRAS Heavy 3 slate in order to house a new Scottish whisky distillery, Ardross. Existing stone and slate from the location’s original, dilapidated farm buildings were salvaged and reused to rebuild much of the walls and roof of the development. However, Heavy 3 was selected to maintain a uniform aesthetic where the original slate could not be re-used.
Cupa pizarras’ slate chosen for luxury coastal properties

Cupa pizarras’ slate chosen for luxury coastal properties

Cupa Pizarras

CUPA PIZARRAS’ CUPA 18 natural slate has been used to achieve a high-quality finish on three luxury, modern, new build properties in one of the most desirable areas of Whitstable in Kent. The new properties, built by local property designer and developer specialist Kapra Developments, are located in Island Wall, Whitstable, close to both the town centre and the scenic Kent coastline. The three storey, five bedroom luxury properties are each in excess of 360 square metres and benefit from views over the nearby golf course.  The unique design of the houses features extensive use of dark grey aluminium glazing systems including rooftop lanterns and large sloping roof windows. The placement of the expansive glazing as well as the layout and orientation of the buildings was devised to maximize the natural light and make the most of the surrounding landscape. In addition to the CUPA 18 natural slate, the design also includes high quality natural timber cladding, sedum green roofing and natural stone blockwork. Kim Brown, Director at Kapra Developments explained: “For the properties on Island Wall, the quality of the materials was very important and the coastal location meant that a durable product was essential. We had used CUPA PIZARRAS’ products on previous projects and so we were confident that the CUPA 18 slate would provide the look, quality and longevity we wanted.” CUPA 18 is a lighter grey slate with a smooth matt surface and has a superior, homogenous finish with only minor variations allowed in the thickness and flatness of the slate. The slate roofs were installed by Bates (Kent), a family owned contractor based near Canterbury, who has worked with Kapra Developments on a number of previous projects. David Clarke, Company Secretary at Bates said: “The Island Wall properties presented a few complexities and challenges due to the steep pitch of the roof and the need to integrate the slate with the other elements such as the large format glazing.  “We’ve used CUPA products on a number of contracts and found the slates very easy to work with. The strength and quality of the slates means that we are able to reduce the amount of wastage compared with other products.” Kim Brown concluded: “To achieve the intended result for these properties has required hard work from everyone involved. We are once again delighted with CUPA PIZARRAS’ products and are pleased with how that element of the build has progressed.” CUPA PIZARRAS’ natural slate is sustainably extracted from quarries in northern Spain. It has an exceptional life span of 100 years and requires minimal maintenance throughout its lifetime.
Cupa r4 slates on show at welsh art gallery

Cupa r4 slates on show at welsh art gallery

Cupa Pizarras

A private art gallery in Betws Y Coed has been roofed using CUPA R4 natural Spanish slate, selected by the client and their contractor on the basis of appearance, performance and cost, as well as their ready availability through local stockists. Work on The Galeri was begun by the owner some three years ago, with locally based Willparr Roofing being tasked with sourcing and installing the thousands of new slates required to weather a structure featuring a dormer window, the valley junction to an existing pitch, and other challenging details.
A brand new Cupa Pizarras slate roof for the Renfrew Town Hall

A brand new Cupa Pizarras slate roof for the Renfrew Town Hall

Cupa Pizarras

If there is one thing that characterizes Scotland and touches all its visitors, that is its natural surroundings and historical buildings, which still retain their original charm. So, as the world leader in natural slate, we are proud that our slates have been chosen to renovate one of these heritage buildings: the Renfrew Town Hall and Museum. THE BEST CHOICE FOR HERITAGE BUILDINGS As part of a refurbishment programme, The Renfrew Town Hall roof has been recently renewed with our natural slate Heavy 3. This slate has been the perfect choice to keep its original appeal of tradition and heritage.
A Historic Slate Installation Fit for Leaders of the World at the G7 Summit

A Historic Slate Installation Fit for Leaders of the World at the G7 Summit

Cupa Pizarras

CUPA PIZARRAS has been specified across a major development and refurbishment at Tregenna Castle. The company’s products were selected for their ability to endure extreme local weather and provide an exceptionally long lifespan.Delivering spectacular views of the St Ives coastline, the Castle Approach Estate is a new collection of lodges built in the grounds of the historic Tregenna Castle Resort.Looking to complete the exclusive lodges, roofing contractor, Summit Roofing Solutions utilised a number of CUPA PIZARRAS’ products. Likewise, the project team also chose to use the company’s natural slate to complete a renovation of Tregenna Castle’s original roof.The lodges and castle are subject to difficult coastal conditions, including extreme winds and sea spray. As such, the project team needed access to roofing solutions that could deliver long-lasting, durable performance. Likewise, given Tregenna Castle’s status as a Grade II listed property, the team had to ensure that any selected products were able to deliver a traditional aesthetic, whilst still providing modern performance. Fortunately, CUPA PIZARRAS natural slate was able to meet all the desired criteria.Therefore, roofs on the lodges at Tregenna Estate exclusively used CUPA PIZARRAS’ 400mm x 200mm CUPA 12 natural slates, fixed using 100mm stainless steel hooks that were also produced and supplied by CUPA PIZARRAS.Notably, Summit Roofing Solutions was able to install the natural slate as a closed mitred hip system. In doing so, the project team ensured that all slates lined up perfectly with one another, which is only possible on account of the products’ uniform size and quality. This was particularly important on the lodges, where sections of roof were stepped down in certain locations and visible from ground level. Speaking on the project at Tregenna Estate, Adam Palmer, Company Owner of Summit Roofing Solutions commented: “Upon receiving the brief, we recognized that CUPA PIZARRAS’ solutions could help us to meet all key project goals. What’s more, the company helped us to overcome logistical challenges.”Following project completion, the Tregenna Estate played host to key stakeholders attending the G7 Summit in Cornwall, including the Prime Minister and US President Joe Biden. In anticipation of the event, enhanced security provisions were put in place on the site, which made the logistical side of the project more difficult.Thankfully, through its extensive distribution network, CUPA PIZARRAS was able to devise a well-considered delivery and logistics plan to ensure that supplies could reach the project team at critical times.CUPA 12 was chosen for this prestigious project as it is a high quality dark grey slate with a smooth finish. With a life span of more than one hundred years and very little maintenance required, natural slate is a durable, weatherproof product, un-matched by artificial alternatives. CUPA 12 has also received approval from Snowdonia National Park as a Welsh Slate alternative and has been certified by BRE Global as A+ for its quality, transparency, and sustainability credentials. Find out more about CUPA PIZARRAS solutions here at https://www.cupapizarras.com/uk/  
Unique refurb with slates gives UK windmill ultimate coastal weather protection

Unique refurb with slates gives UK windmill ultimate coastal weather protection

Cupa Pizarras

In a stunning architectural statement, CUPA PIZARRAS R17 slate has been specified to meet the design challenges of a former Georgian windmill renovation at Fort Green, near Aldeburgh in Suffolk. The first project of its kind in the UK, the natural slate was individually cut and fixed through expert craftsmanship to accommodate the building’s exterior curve while also providing crucial protection from the harsh coastal environment. Originally, the windmill walls were going to be clad in cedar shingles however, contractor ELC Roofing recommended using the rectangular CUPA R17 slate from CUPA PIZARRAS as a more weather-resistant alternative. ELC Roofing Owner, Edward Carlo, explains: “The R17 is a natural, non-carbonated blue-black slate with non-rusting metallic particles and thin laminations. From our perspective, it’s a tried and tested product that we specify and install on a lot of our projects – especially in coastal situations like this.” The slates, which protect against the salt water and wind, have been fitted on both the windmill’s curved wall, its pitched roof and elsewhere adding design details to the property’s walls. He goes on to say: “Aesthetically, the ocean environment has inspired the material choice with the slate mirroring the scales of a fish. This gives the windmill a dramatic architectural style; one that also sympathetically ties into the slate roof of the neighbouring cottage, which we replaced with CUPA R17 the previous year. “As far as I am aware, nothing like this windmill has been done in the UK. It was a case of starting from scratch to devise the optimum installation method, which involved a lot of detailed calculations.” For the tower, which has a 15m circumference at the base tapering to 11m at the top, the team initially removed the thick render on the windmill wall, taking it back to the original brickwork. Next, to meet the challenge of the curve and tapering of the wall, 50mm counter battens were fitted to the tower’s brickwork. Then, multiple strips of ply were cut and glued together to create the curve. These panels were screwed to the counter battens to provide an anchor for the fixing system. The ply was also primed to protect the surface from water ingress and a breathable membrane applied to protect the brickwork. In terms of fixing the slates to the panels, Edward said: “For a more corrosion and wind-resistant solution, I decided on the French technique of a stainless steel hook fixing system to install the slate, as opposed to nails.” Ensuring the layout worked exactly with the curves, the slate was lasered from top to bottom to perk it out, which took five days to do. Horizontal tiling battens were also marked to ensure the slates were fixed at the right height. Every single slate was cut and fixed individually to accommodate the curve and ensure they aligned with the building’s inset windows as well as other architectural details - a very precise process that required expert levels of craftsmanship. Preventing the slates from getting smaller at height, the team designed-in a series of lead bands that go all around the building at each storey level. These sit underneath the windows to create a consistent appearance visually. The windmill’s domed copper roof existed already and the adjoining tower, which is horizontally clad in a white weatherboard, features a slated pitched roof. ELC Roofing has again used CUPA PIZARRAS <a href="https://www.cupapizarras.com/uk/news/why-spanish-slates/">spanish slates</a>. In this instance, the roof curves to the back end with four leaded hips to one end and two to the other with a connecting lead ridge. This time the slates were fitted to 20 x 50mm battens with a layer of permeable membrane. This part of the roof also features a striking onion-shaped finial. Expertly crafted by ELC Roofing, the finial is produced out of a patchwork of small pieces of soft copper, topped off with a fish that acts as a weather vane and includes stunning marble eyes. To the other side of the clad tower, CUPA PIZARRAS slate has been used to create a vertical square panel detail to the front of the building and fixed using the hook system again. Commenting on this challenging project, Edward said: “Work on site started before the first Covid-19 lockdown so as well as the challenging weather conditions that a coastal location like this presents, the team also had to complete the work with government guidance and restrictions in place. Regardless, the client is overwhelmed with the end result and so are we.” To find out more about the CUPA PIZARRAS range of natural slate visit: https://www.cupapizarras.com/uk/natural-slate-roofing/
Cupa Pizarras roof slate chosen in prestigious langton homes development

Cupa Pizarras roof slate chosen in prestigious langton homes development

Cupa Pizarras

Easton Square, an exclusive development of four bespoke, luxury 6-bedroom houses, features CUPA 12 R Excellence roofing slates. The product was selected for its superior qualities including its adaptability, longevity and polished finish. The exclusive Langton Homes development is set in large private grounds in Great Easton. Each property features over 5,500 square feet of accommodation and has been tailored towards the individual needs of each occupier. CUPA 12 slate has been used across all four Easton Square dwellings including the properties’ associated outbuildings and garages.
The Slate Yard, Salford

The Slate Yard, Salford

Broxap Ltd

A modern timber canopy for a communal outdoor area was designed for residents at a flagship development.
The Slate Yard, Salford

The Slate Yard, Salford

Akzo Nobel Powder Coatings Ltd

Finishes: Interpon D2525 Ordos Sable YW387I, Ambre Sable Y2316F & Patah YW267I
CEMBRIT BBA CERTIFIED SLATES TAKE CARE OF ROOFING AT A NEW RETIREMENT VILLAGE IN OXFORDSHIRE

CEMBRIT BBA CERTIFIED SLATES TAKE CARE OF ROOFING AT A NEW RETIREMENT VILLAGE IN OXFORDSHIRE

Cembrit Ltd

Westerland and Moorland, BBA certified fibre cement slates from Cembrit, have helped achieve a Code for Sustainable Homes and a BREEAM ‘Very Good’ rating for a newly built £30 million retirement village in Oxfordshire.Built by BAM Construct UK and due for completion in December 2016, the project is built in an attractive, traditional style which is complemented by Cembrit’s Westerland and Moorland slates. Based in Hertfordshire, BAM Construct UK worked with roofing specialist Attleys Roofing Ltd on the project.
Raj Green Sandstone Paving and Pool Copings with a contrast Brazilian Black Slate Roman End

Raj Green Sandstone Paving and Pool Copings with a contrast Brazilian Black Slate Roman End

Stoneworld Oxfordshire Ltd

Stoneworld have supplied Brazilian Slate and Raj Green Sandstone paving and pool copings
Cembrit BBA certified slates provide attractive finish to new housing development

Cembrit BBA certified slates provide attractive finish to new housing development

Cembrit Ltd

The oldest street in Coventry features a newly built housing development that remains in keeping with the area’s historic background, thanks to the installation of Cembrit’s Jutland fibre cement slates. Far Gosford Street is setting of many historic stories. Now, it features a new gated community, comprising 30 three and four bedroom mews style houses. Kilby Mews forms part of a wider multi million pound private and public sector regeneration project to develop Far Gosford Street.
elZinc Slate Advance - Coast Bournemouth

elZinc Slate Advance - Coast Bournemouth

SIG Design & Technology

This group of seafront apartments on the site of the former Bournemouth International Hotel is perched right on the cliff side. The modern aesthetic of white render and glazed balconies is offset with crisp elZinc zinc cladding supplied by SIG Zinc & Copper and installed by the specialist cladding team at ICEE. The project for Taylor Wimpey Southern Counties was designed post-planning and managed on site by architects WADP.
Devonian roof for Jurassic fossils, with Glendyne Slate

Devonian roof for Jurassic fossils, with Glendyne Slate

Burton Roofing Merchants Ltd

Fossil museum The Etches Collection, in Kimmeridge, Dorset, is protected by a new high-performance roof in keeping with its character, thanks to Glendyne.

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