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Application

  • Overspill parking.
  • Amenity paving.
  • Fire access, where solely restricted to this use.

Description

Grassroad is a simple method of achieving a surface that combines both a high proportion of grass and the ability to accept infrequent traffic load. Manufactured from re-cycled polypropylene the interlocking honeycomb cells feature an underlying cleat to give resistance to surface shear.

A naturally percolating system that when used with an underlying attenuation structure can be incorporated as a Sustainable Urban Drainage (SUDS) system.

Grassroad polypropylene pavers form a matrix of honeycomb cells with up to 95% grass cover. The combination of these two elements helps to create a three dimensional grid reinforcement system that under infrequent use and with a full grass growth will handle vehicular traffic.

Can be used with gravel infill for applications such as tree surrounds. Gravell infill is not however recommended for traffic applications.

The perimeter of installations can be finished with Grasskerb dry fixed pre-formed kerb units enabling a free-formed concealed edge to be achieved.

Applications:

  • Overspill parking.
  • Amenity paving.
  • Fire access, where solely restricted to this use.

General information
Size

635 x 330 x 32 mm (plus 10 mm cleat) unit size

622 x 311 x 32 mm modular laid dimension

Material

Recycled polypropylene. Interlocking to all sides. Shear cleats

Uniclass 2015 Plastics cellular pavers (Pr_25_93_60_61)
Specification data
Product Reference

Grassroad

Colour

Black

Standard.

Green

Special order.

Size

635 x 330 x 32 mm (plus 10 mm cleat) unit size

622 x 311 x 32 mm modular laid dimension

Grasskerb GK45

Not required

Required

Standard product features

Material:

Recycled polypropylene. Interlocking to all sides. Shear cleats.

Product Options

Grasskerb GK45

1000 x 80 x 45 mm deep with 250 x 7 mm diameter. Galvanised steel pins fixed at minimum 500 mm centres for straight alignment and 333 mm for curves.

Literature